Emma



NARRATOR

In a time when one's town was one's town was one's world...and the actions
at a dance excited greater interest than the movement of armies, there
lived a young woman, who knew how this world should be runned.

EMMA

The most beautiful thing in the world is a match well made, and a happy
marriage to you both.

MRS WESTON

Oh, thank you Emma. Your painting grows more accomplished every day.

EMMA

You are very kind, but it would be all the better if I had practiced my
drawing more, as you urged me.

MRS WESTON

It's very beautiful.

MR ELTON

I should never take sides against you, Miss Woodhouse, but your friend is right. It is indeed a job well done.

EMMA

The job well done, Mr Elton was yours in performing the ceremony.

MR WOODHOUSE

Must the church be so drafty, Mr Elton? It is very difficult to surrender the soul when one is worried about one's throat.

MR ELTON

Perhaps some tea and cake would revive you, Mr Woodhouse.

MR WOODHOUSE

Miss Taylor! Surely you are not serving cake at your wedding! Far too rich!
You put us all at peril. And I am not alone in feeling so. Where is Mr Penning, the apothecary, he will support me.

MRS WESTON

He's over there, Mr Woodhouse, having some cake.

MR WOODHOUSE

What?!

EMMA

I have to take father home, but dear Miss Taylor-Oh, no! You are dear Miss
Taylor no more! You are dear Mrs Weston now! And how happy this must make
you. Such happiness this brings to all of us.

MRS WESTON

My dear Emma!

SCENE 2-HARTFIELD

MR WOODHOUSE

Poor Miss Taylor! She was so happy here. Why should she give up being your governess, only to be married?

EMMA

I am grown now. She cannot put up with my ill humors forever. She must wish for children of her own.

MR WOODHOUSE

You have no ill humors. Your own mother, God rest her, could be no more
real than Miss Taylor. Can she truly wish to give life to a mewling infant who will import disease each time it enters the house? No, I say poor Miss Taylor, and poor indeed she is.

MR KNIGHTLEY

As an old friend of the family, I had to ask as soon as I got back: Who
cried the most at the wedding?

(later)

EMMA

And how is my sister? Is your brother giving her the respect we Woodhouse
ladies deserve?

MR WOODHOUSE

Poor Isabella. She was the first to leave me. No doubt that is where Miss
Taylor got the notion to go.

MR KNIGHTLEY

Don't be too hard on Miss Taylor. It must be easier for her to have only
one to please than two.

EMMA

Especially when one of us is such a troublesome creature.

MR WOODHOUSE

Yes, I am. Most troublesome.

EMMA

Dear papa, I could never mean you! Mr Knightley loves to find fault with
me, that's all. It's his idea of a joke.

MR KNIGHTLEY

I am practically a brother to you Emma. It is not a brother's job to find
fault with his sister?

MR WOODHOUSE

But where is the fault with you? Emma bears it well, but she is most sorry
to lose Miss Taylor.

MR KNIGHTLEY

We would not like Emma so well if she did not miss her friend.

MR WOODHOUSE

Thank you.

EMMA

I shall miss her so. I do not know what I shall do without her.

MR KNIGHTLEY

She's not far.

MR WOODHOUSE

Almost half a mile.

EMMA

Her obligations are there now. She cannot sit and talk with me in the old way, or walk with me, or urge me to better myself.

MR KNIGHTLEY

Well, that should not matter, as you always did just as you pleased.

EMMA

Yes, but I shall miss her urging me. She was a selfless a friend as I have ever had, and I hope to say someday that I have done half so much for someone as Mrs Weston did for me.

MR KNIGHTLEY

You must be happy that she settled so well.

EMMA

Indeed! One matter of joy in this is that I made the match myself. People said Mr Weston would never marry again, and what a triumph!

MR KNIGHTLEY

Triumph! You made a lucky guess!

EMMA

Have you never known a triumph from a lucky guess? Had I not promoted Mr Weston's visits, and given encouragement where encouragement was needed, we might not have had a wedding today.

MR WOODHOUSE

Then please, my dear, encourage nowhere else. Marriage is so disrupting to one's social circle.

EMMA

Only one more, papa. When Mr Elton joined their hands today, he looked very
much like he would like the same kind of office performed for him.

MR KNIGHTLEY

*sigh*

MR WOODHOUSE

Invite him for dinner. That is kindness enough.

MR KNIGHTLEY

Mr Elton is a man of twenty-six. He knows how to take care of himself.

EMMA

One does not like to generalize about so many people all at once, Mr
Knightley, but you may be sure that men know nothing of their hearts,
whether they be six and twenty, or six and eighty. Except you, of course,
father. No, Mr Elton will be the next person to benefit from my help.

MR KNIGHTLEY

Poor Miss Taylor indeed! 'Tis Mr Elton which deserves our pity.

SCENE 3-PARTY AT HARTFIELD

EMMA

Mr Elton! Welcome to our party!

MR ELTON

Yes, Miss Woodhouse, thank you indeed for including me. A party is a party, but a party on a summers eve...

EMMA

It relieves my mind very much that you are here, for there is someone new in our group. Her name is Harriet Smith, and she is a former pupil of Mrs Goddard. I had never met Miss Smith before this evening, and am already struck by her charm. I wonder if I might ask you to make certain she is at ease throughout the evening.

MR ELTON

If helping Miss Smith would help Miss Woodhouse, then I am happy to be of service.

EMMA

Come, I shall make the introduction.

MISS BATES

Miss Woodhouse! We've come quite overpowered!

EMMA

Oh, Mrs Bates, Miss Bates, so happy you could co-

MISS BATES

No, we are the happy ones- well, ho do you do Mr Elton? We are the happy
ones. Not only to be here tonight, but also for the beautiful hindquarter of pork you sent us. It has been heaven itself. What a happy porker it must have come from! {laugh} We are so obliged for you sending it to us. (To Mrs Bates) PORK!. (To Emma and Mr Elton) And we're so obliged for you having us tonight, very much indeed. I was just saying to mother, 'we should be invited' and indeed we are. Oh, doesn't your hair look pretty? Just like an angel. (To Mrs Bates) ANGEL, mother. (to Emma and Mr Elton) Oh, speaking of angels, Mr Elton, your sermon on Daniel in the Lion's Den was so inspiring, so powerful in all it's particulars, it left us speechless. Quite speechless, I tell you, and we have not stopped talking of it since. Oh, isn't this a lovely party? Lovely, lovely, lovely!


accomplished- znakomity, doskonały
at ease- swobodny
be of service- być pomocnym
benefit from- odnosić korzyści z
better- polepszać
charm- czar, urok
creature- stworzenie
disrupt- przerywać, zakłócać
drafty- pełen przeciągów
former- poprzedni, były, dawny
give up- zaprzestać, porzucić
governess- guwernantka
hindquarter- tylna ćwiartka tułowia (zwierzęcia)
import- przenosić, wnosić
include- włączać, uwzględniać
indeed- istotnie, w istocie
infant- dziecię
make the introduction- przedstawiać
match- małżeństwo
mewl- łkać
notion- pragnienie
obligation- obowiązek, zobowiązanie
obliged- zobowiązany
overpowered- pokonany
particulars- szczegóły
peril- niebezpieczeństwo, zagrożenie
promote-popierać, przyspieszać
put up with- znosić
relieve- odciążać, uwalniać, przynosić ulgę
revive- ożywiać
selfless- bezinteresowny
sermon- kazanie
settle- osiąść, ustatkować się
speechless- oniemiały
speechless- oniemiały
struck- być pod silnym wrażeniem
surrender- poddawać się, wyrzekać, oddawać
take sides against- stawać przeciwko komuś
throughout- w ciągu, do końca
troublesome- nieznośny, kłopotliwy
urge- zalecać, nalegać, przekonywać

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